1. Canary has taken flight

    Introducing Canary: a mobile application that tracks and offsets your digital carbon footprint. Visit canaryinthecloud.com for more information.

  2. Watch our live presentations, May 12th.

    Watch my classmates and I present our thesis work live at the SVA Theatre in New York City, 11am-4pm on May 12th. 

  3. My process book is now available for digital reading and hard copies will be arriving soon. While I am still working on my thesis deliverables (this being one of them) and final presenation, I pulled another all-nighter with fellow classmate and taxi buddy Chris Cannon to finish up the content/layout for my process book and send it to Blurb for publishing. My goal was to get it ready for our exhibition on May 12th so I had to put content on lock down, even though coversations and work today has already rendered my book outdated. Oh, c’est la thesis.

    My process book is now available for digital reading and hard copies will be arriving soon. While I am still working on my thesis deliverables (this being one of them) and final presenation, I pulled another all-nighter with fellow classmate and taxi buddy Chris Cannon to finish up the content/layout for my process book and send it to Blurb for publishing. My goal was to get it ready for our exhibition on May 12th so I had to put content on lock down, even though coversations and work today has already rendered my book outdated. Oh, c’est la thesis.

  4. Just finished designs for Canary: an iPhone app that tracks your digital content production and subsequent CO2 emissions. First flight is May 12, 2012.

    Just finished designs for Canary: an iPhone app that tracks your digital content production and subsequent CO2 emissions. First flight is May 12, 2012.

  5. I’ve been working on designing Canary’s iPhone app screens. Here’s a sneak peek of the offset screen for Instagram, displaying current and previous offsets with options to pay an offset immediately or setup a monthly autopay. I decided that every 100 grams of CO2 emissions would equal $0.10. For user uploading 50-60 pictures a month, he/she would have the option of paying $1.02 to a local carbon offset project for the month’s CO2 emissions.

    I’ve been working on designing Canary’s iPhone app screens. Here’s a sneak peek of the offset screen for Instagram, displaying current and previous offsets with options to pay an offset immediately or setup a monthly autopay. I decided that every 100 grams of CO2 emissions would equal $0.10. For user uploading 50-60 pictures a month, he/she would have the option of paying $1.02 to a local carbon offset project for the month’s CO2 emissions.

  6. The process of my process

    I’ve reached a critical crossroads in my thesis work: the point at which this process blog, my final documentation (process book), and work on the Canary project are nearly parallel. I have three weeks left to finish multiple deliverables and time management now trumps any and all decisions. As a result, this will be the second to last entry of my thesis blog. My final entry will be a link to the live stream of our final presentations on May 12th.

    For the remaining time, I will be preparing:

    • Process Book - The keystone deliverable and documentation of all my work over the last year. I’ve completed nearly 2/3 of it and have to tighten up content as well as references/spelling, nevermind the documentation of the final project - Canary. The process book will also be the basis of my thesis defense presentation on April 25th.
    • Canary - I just finished my wireframes for the app (see below for details). I outlined my video and have identified five core user flows and screens to design. There still maybe time to revise my wireflows I created a few days ago, but this will be one of those “nice to haves”. Additionally, I must design and animate the key flows/screens to repurpose for the video, canary website, and final presentation.
    • Final Presentation - I outlined a draft version (v.2.0) of my final presentation, and will be presenting this version to my classmates on this Wednesday, April 18th.

    Thesis Exhibition - Immediately following our presentations at the SVA Theatre, we have a reception and exhibtion of our thesis work back at our studio. I outlined a sketch for the setup and talked takeaways with my cousin Sara who will be helping me out with design/production.

    Over this past week, I’m up to three cups o’ coffee (sometimes four) and wireframing/prototyping the Canary app. With a little help from my classmates, I quickly learned two awesome rapid prototyping tools for the iPhone: TAP and LiveView. Seriously, these are my new favorite applications. Using these new tools, I created some key screens, killed a few, modified others, and got ready for my a review with Mari Sheibley, lead design at Foursquare (thanks to Michael Yap for setting it up). The review went awesome and Mari gave me some super valuable feedback. Soon after, I met with Cooper to discuss our wireframes, stripping out features and complexity. After a solid weekend of work and a visit to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, I shored my wireframes and prepped for final designs.

    Before my review with Mari, I met with Liz to discuss the status and approach of my process book and takeaways for the thesis exhibition. I left the meeting feeling engerized and subsequently pulled an all nighter working on my process book. It felt great to check a few items off the deliverables list as well as work alongside a fellow IxD’ers late night in the studio.

  7. Moving from concept map to wireframing, there seemed to gap in process. Cooper, Sera, and I have been disussing various mobile UI patterns for the iPhone (navigation styles, actions, pages, and sorting structures) and different techniques of wireframing/prototyping - figuring out a few approaches to fill this gap. For me, a wire flow exercise seemed to do the trick.
Above is a snippet of wire flows for the Canary iPhone app: high-level wireframes outlining overall structure, global functions, key features based on my concept map, and user flows for common tasks. The intention is for these wire flows to inform my wireframes, which I’ll be working on and prototyping over the next 3 days. View the all the wire flows in poster format.

    Moving from concept map to wireframing, there seemed to gap in process. Cooper, Sera, and I have been disussing various mobile UI patterns for the iPhone (navigation styles, actions, pages, and sorting structures) and different techniques of wireframing/prototyping - figuring out a few approaches to fill this gap. For me, a wire flow exercise seemed to do the trick.

    Above is a snippet of wire flows for the Canary iPhone app: high-level wireframes outlining overall structure, global functions, key features based on my concept map, and user flows for common tasks. The intention is for these wire flows to inform my wireframes, which I’ll be working on and prototyping over the next 3 days. View the all the wire flows in poster format.

  8. I just finished a concept map/feature set model of my service, Canary. Above is the full system model, outlining the core interaction and four key features of the app. View the booklet that breaks down the different actors, key actions, and features.

    I just finished a concept map/feature set model of my service, Canary. Above is the full system model, outlining the core interaction and four key features of the app. View the booklet that breaks down the different actors, key actions, and features.

  9. The Coal Button site is now live. Just remember: behind every click, there’s a little lump of coal.

    The Coal Button site is now live. Just remember: behind every click, there’s a little lump of coal.

  10. I’m designing and building my first prototype, with some inspiration and advice from Adrian Westaway of Vitamins. When designing for design research, Adrian suggested, “try to design a journey to take them (participants) on”. Yesterday, I created 6 Gmail accounts, 5 ifttt accounts, 50 ifttt tasks to send emails from 5 of the newly created Gmail accounts to 1 “master” Gmail account (This sentence could’ve been written in code).

    All the repetition set up a prototype that tracks participants’ production and distribution of public digital content. Using the collected data, I plan to publicly display behaviors such as amounts of tweets, uploaded photos, and status updates with Legos. Yes, Legos, a physical embodiement of data and my childhood. With insight from my survey, I will also be equating each behavior with a CO2 emission, updating up the totals daily to the physical display as well as an online component.

    With this prototype, I hope to test a few biases/assumptions:

    1. The quantified feedback should positively impact participants’ production and distribution of online content.
    2. The public display will create a “shaming” effect: first with the sheer amounts of conent being produced by each participant and secondly with the subsequent creation of CO2 emissions.
    3. By observing each participants display, non-participants will have an increased awareness of their own online habits and CO2 emissions.
    4. Incentive to conserve does not have to involve monetary motivation, and can be based solely on normative comparison to similar groups of people.